Tag Archives: crafting

Creative charge: Tree of life

Last weekend, I needed a break from writing. I love trying many different crafts, both because learning new skills is fun, and because it gives me a creative boost to create something beautiful. So I took a few hours to just let myself try something new.

I’d been seeing a variety of wire-wrapped pendants pop up on my Pinterest digest emails, and thought I might be able to make one (given a good tutorial). I ended up on YouTube, where I found this lovely, easy to follow video: https://youtu.be/IEQTRvha7dI

I had almost all of the needed supplies, but ended up making do with wrapping two 20-gauge wires together for the frame. All in all, I think it turned out pretty okay for a first attempt:

Plus, sometimes it’s nice to start and finish something in the same sitting. Now back to the never ending task of writing and editing my manuscript, though with a bit more creative juice flowing.

Happy crafting!

#StainedGlass window is finally done! #crafting #inspiration

This is it! The 6′ x 3′ window I’ve been working on since 2010 is finally done.

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The pictures speak for themselves, so you can stop reading if you don’t want to know any more, but below I’ve put a few thoughts on the process.

IMG_1155 Finished piece waiting on the table in the garage.

Why did it take so long? Life gets in the way. Given the amount of time I have to work on this type of project, had I done it straight through (meaning, had I not gotten pregnant had a small baby, and taken a couple of years off of glass crafting because it takes time and concentration, both of which I didn’t have), I think it would have taken a couple of months. But it’s that much sweeter to see it hanging in our morning room knowing that it’s been waiting for me for a while now.

This has been my largest piece to date, and one that I did every step entirely on my own (other than installation; my wonderful husband and father did that for me) — all my own cutting, foiling, soldering, etc. Feels really good to have accomplished it!

IMG_1186 One of the boys working on installing the window.

A few lessons I learned along the way:

1) Making your own design is fun, and doesn’t have to be hard. I don’t think of myself as an artist, but I couldn’t find a design that quite did what I needed it to do (i.e. covering the strips that were already between the glass in the window this went in front of). Turns out, you don’t have to be a great artist to make your own design — just try it and see what you get. Plus, unless you go crazy on colors and textures, just about any glass looks nice together.

2) It’s always good to consult with professionals. The advice I got from the glass shop (Leaded Glass Design over in Cuyahoga Falls) was invaluable. For example, I did not know the value of an exact cardboard template until the people at the glass shop mentioned it. I actually ended up taking a “large panel” class there to make sure I did everything right, and it was very helpful.

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Finished window, installed. Cardboard template is resting on the scaffolding below.

3) Don’t be afraid of the glass. I also got great advice from a professional installer (who ended up telling us we didn’t need to pay him to do it, but instead told us how to do it on our own). There’s so much fear when you’ve put this much effort into something. Mostly fear that it will break. The installer told us to be careful, take precaution, but he said that if you’re afraid of the glass you’re much more likely to drop it than if you lift and carry it as if you’re not afraid.

All in all, it’s been a great journey. Now I get to decide what my next glass project will be!

Happy Crafting!

#CherryBlossom #crossstitch

Just wanted to share. This is the cross stitch that I entered in the needlework show at the library (she’s about 14×16 on 18 count Aida fabric):

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Here are some close-ups of the cool details, including cording and backstitching with complementary colors as well as gold thread in some places:

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Her belt is also corded, and I had to learn how to do lazy daisies for her hair:

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This is how she looks displayed on my wall with two smaller companion pieces I made to go with her:

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Happy stitching!

You can do it too! #Kumihimo with #beads, #beading

Looking at some of the amazing beaded Kumihimo* projects in the book I have (see below for a link to it), I was initially a little bit nervous. But when I finally tried one, it turned out not to be so bad. Here’s what I made on my first try:

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Here’s what I learned from it:

1) You can’t tell, but that’s two colors of beads (white and light green). Unfortunately, the mint-colored thread I used overpowered the white beads and they all ended up looking like the same color. I’ll use white cord if I’m using white beads next time.

2) I used a ton of cord to make sure I’d have enough and it ended up being way more than what I needed. There is a way to figure out how much cord and how many beads you need, which is shared in this book: Braiding with Beads 2 – Braiding Solutions on the Kumihimo Disk by Karen DeSousa.

I ended up capping the ends right near the beads and turning it into a bracelet. In any case, I’ll definitely try another beaded project as this one was fun and turned out looking beautiful. 🙂

Happy Kumihimo-ing!

*If you don’ t know what Kumihimo is, check out my post on the subject from a few weeks ago: What is Kumihimo?

Boosting the #brain with #zentangle? #doodles #writing

I recently heard (apparently late, because TONS of people already do this) about a technique to enhance creativity called Zentangle. According to their website:

“Almost anyone can use it to create beautiful images. It increases focus and creativity, provides artistic satisfaction along with an increased sense of personal well being. The Zentangle Method is enjoyed all over this world across a wide range of skills, interests and ages.”

It intrigued me. I’m definitely not someone who draws — in fact, when I “doodle” it’s mostly in words — so I thought this could be a good way to try to exercise a different part of my brain. In fact, some people said that they use it as a quick way to get the creative juices flowing before they do their writing.

The idea is that you take a small space, randomly separate it into smaller areas, then doodle those in, not worrying about making it perfect. I used the website and some YouTube tutorials to get the gist, and bought one book to get some pattern ideas:

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Here’s my first tangle:  

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I also tried to figure out a slightly more complicated pattern:

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I thought that doing this for a few minutes before sitting down for a writing session might help me get focused, but haven’t tried that yet. I’ll report back once I do to let you know whether it helped me, but I’d love anyone’s opinion who has already tried it — did it work for you?

Happy tangling!

Any day now. Finishing my #StainedGlass #window

This is the 6ft x 3ft (see my husband standing behind it to get a sense of the scale) stained glass window that I designed to fit in front of a particular window in my house. I’ve been working on it for… what year was my son born? That’s right. I started more than three years ago.

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It hasn’t taken so long because it was particularly tricky to make. It’s just hard to work on glass projects when you have a baby and a curious toddler in the house.

But the kids are getting older, and this is the year. (You hear me, Amy? We’re really doing it this year!) I’ve just got to finish the edging along the bottom, fit the two halves more permanently together, and install the darn thing.

Wish me luck!

Happy crafting.

A go-to for the #StainedGlass crafter: #Celtic hearts #wedding piece

I wanted to share the below pattern. I’ve used it to make gifts for two weddings now (different color schemes to match the tastes of each couple), and I love it. Here’s one of my finished pieces:

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It’s a teensy bit complicated, particularly when it comes to foiling the tiny squares between the knotwork, but well worth it when you see the look on the face of the people you’re giving it to!

The only problem with literally sharing the pattern is that I freehanded it off of a finished piece I saw somewhere, and because of that the pattern itself is a little skewed. However, I took this picture as straight-on as possible, so if you want to try to freehand your own pattern off of my photo, you are welcome to it.

Happy crafting!